of the North Shore

Site developed by www.sumnerswebs.com © 2010 - 2012

368 Lowell Street  Peabody, MA 01960

(978) 532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

ABOUT US

About Us | Temple History

TEMPLE NER TAMID

PRESIDENTS

1959-1963

Leon Steiff *

1963-1965

Paul Goldman

1965-1967

Henry Kaplan

1967-1969

Irving Babner*

1969-1971

David Derman*

1971-1973

Gerald Monsein

1973-1975

Harold Stone *

1975-1977

Irving Schulman

1977-1979

Joseph Cohen

1979-1980

Bernard Vigor *

1980-1982

David Goldberg

1982-1984

Frank Chmara

1984-1986

Elliot Wyner

1986-1988

David Snyder *

1988-1990

Max Rabinovitch *

1990-1992

Judith Lewis

1992-1994

Mark Rudin

1994-1996

Barry Beck

1996-1998

Ben Rachman

1998-2000

Richard Strauss

2000-2002

Allen Talewsky

2002-2004

Todd Levine

2004-2006

Gary Sparr

2006-2007

Elliot Wyner

2007-2009

Alan Lehman

2009-2010

Cliff Rucker

2010-2012

Scott Feinstein

2012 -2014

Mark Rudin

2014- 2016

Eric Richman

2016 -

Adele Lubarsky

SISTERHOOD

PRESIDENTS

1960-1964

Norma Graff *

1964-1965

Leona Kaplan

1965-1966

Helen Goren *

1966-1967

Joanne Elefson

1967-1968

Selma Razin

1968-1969

Carol Stone Fromer

1969-1970

Gloria Simons

1970-1971

Ina Romo *

1971-1972

Marilyn Sullaway*

1972-1973

Rhoda Tanner

1973-1974

Ann Barosin*

1974-1975

Arlene Vigor

1975-1977

Anita Baker *

1977-1979

Judy Leventhal *

1979-1980

Anita Rudin

1980-1981

Harriet Feinstein

1981-1983

Ellen Chmara

1983-1985

Norma Mazur *

1985-1987

Barbara Kuhn

1987-1988

Anita Baker *

Judy Leventhal *

Anita Rudin

1988-1990

Janice Wyner

1990-1993

Linda Harrison *

1993-1995

Irene Gustat

1995-1997

Cynthia Greene

1997-1999

Marianne Bob *

1999-2001

Susan Savy

2001-2003

Arlyne Greenspan

2003-2004

Lois Black

Marianne Bob *

Sue Savy

2004-2005

Sandee Matteucci

Susan Savy

2005-2006

Ethel Babner

Sandee Matteucci

2006-2007

Ethel Babner

2007-2009

Lisa Stone

2009-2011

Harriet Feinstein

2011- 2013

Elisa Zimmerman

2013- 2015

Judy Kemp

2015 -

Sue Callum

MEN’S CLUB

PRESIDENTS

1961-1963

Gerald Wyner *

1963-1965

Edward Schultz *

1965-1967

Stephen Green *

1967-1968

Daniel Greiff

1968-1969

George Rosenthal *

1969-1970

Melvin Babner

1970-1972

Sumner Feinstein*

1972-1973

Lawrence Baker

1973-1974

Irving Orloff

1974-1975

Morris Sack

1975-1976

Leonard Mulsman

1976-1978

Elliot Wyner

1978-1979

Warren Freedman

1979-1980

Gerald Leventhal *

1980-1982

Mark Rudin

1982-1983

Ronald Promer

1983-1984

Kenneth Fine

1984-1986

Joseph Winokur *

1986-1987

Jeffrey Schultz

1987-1988

Howard Karas

1988-1990

Richard Strauss

1990-1992

Arthur Lewis

1992-1993

Lawrence Shuman

1993-1994

Alan Lehman

1994-1996

Mark Gershlak

1996-1998

Allen Talewsky

1998-2000

Harvey Cohen

2000-2002

Alan S. Titelbaum

2002-2003

Eric Richman

2003-2005

Mark Lubarsky

2005-2007

Mark Lerner

2007-2009

David Ponn

2009-2010

Scott Feinstein

2010-2011

Todd Levine

2011-2012

Irving Burday

2012-2013

Mark Lubarsky

2013-

Larry Malatzky

The HOLOCAUST TORAH

in Founders Hall

This Torah from Kadno, Czecholslovakia is number 1264 of 1564 scrolls taken by the Nazis during World War II for their “Museum of an Extinct Race”

Holocaust Torah

TEMPLE HISTORY

by HENRY KAPLAN


It was late summer of 1959, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur were approaching, and a major development of the area west of downtown Peabody was taking place,  especially in the area now known as west Peabody.   The exodus from the Jewish ghettos around Boston brought many Jewish families into these new housing developments.


One of these families was Janice and Al Cohen, who recently moved from Kansas city.  Following a yahrzeit minyan at their home for Janice’s father, they suggested to those present that a ‘Temple should be formed’.  Present and interested were the Zeltzers (Hy and Jean), the Steiffs (Charlotte and Leon) and others.

 

What would they do for the holidays?  Many, if not most, had come from orthodox Shuls but they weren’t inclined toward the orthodox any longer.  This was a shift taking place not only in Boston, but around the country.  A group of these people came together to plan for the coming high holidays. They rented Cy Tenney hall in west Peabody for the services. Somehow, they came up with a torah and the services were conducted by Leon Steiff and others.

 

Many new friendships were formed at these services and this group was the beginning of a new Jewish movement in the city.  Between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, there were a number of meetings held in peoples homes.  Temple Ner Tamid had begun!  Shortly thereafter, a Sunday school was started at the Cy Tenney hall.


Much work needed to be done. If there were to be services

On the Shabbat, where would they be held? Would we need a rabbi  right away?  And what else would be needed? Many people joined.  These founding members established dues initially at $18.00.

 

The Temple’s first home was Anshe Sfard, a small Shul on Littles Lane in Peabody square.


Although there was a  Hebrew school at the community center, the temple membership felt that Ner Tamid  should have its own Hebrew school.  Where to hold it?  There wasn’t enough room at Anshe Sfard.  The location chosen was the building owned and used by the Sephardic congregation on Pierpont Street. This had been a multi story home that now housed the Sephardic congregation. With the help of city school officials, old used desks and chairs that the city no longer  needed were obtained and the school was started.  A number of temple congregants who were teachers had an important hand in starting the school and forming its early curriculum.


The year following the formation of the temple, the high holidays  were approaching. Where to hold high holiday services? The north shore shopping center, an open mall, had been built 6 years earlier and they an auditorium in the lower level. This was to be the location for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services until the Temple was completed in 1965.


At this time, the Temple membership was in the range of 120 to 150 families. If a building was to be built then a piece of land would have to be obtained and funds raised.


A plot of land was obtained. The land, on which now stands the pilgrim nursing home, was to be the home of Temple Ner Tamid.

A fundraiser was hired and a campaign initiated to raise the necessary funds for a new building. While this was going on,

The land upon which the temple now sits became available.

Through the efforts of the late Judge Abraham Ankeles the land parcels were swapped somehow and the Temple Ner Tamid building program was off the ground. The architectural firm of Bedar and Alpers was hired to design a building. Once the design was approved, a contractor was engaged. The ground breaking ceremony was a gala event attended by a large throng including many city officials.  At the time, there was no road and people had to climb through the woods to get to the top of the hill where the ceremonies were to take place.


MORE TO COME....

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* of blessed memory

* of blessed memory

* of blessed memory